Monday, October 27, 2008

Lebanon's Military Wish List

[courtesy of the NYTimes]

2 comments:

  1. As much as I see the rational for the Air Defense System or for the TOW missiles, which are an absolute necessity for a truly independent Lebanon, I am not sure the M60 are a very good idea. If it is to stand up to a hypothetical Israeli invasion, they are worthless. If it is to stand up to Syria, they are still insufficient. Even to crush Hezbollah, they are totally unadapted. The Lebanese army needs better APC's than its current outdated M113 and some good intervention vehicles. Even the Humvees seem to me the wrong answer. They are heavy, cumbersome and poorly or not armored.

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  2. Hey Alphast,

    Good to hear from you again.

    Quickly, I think its important to highlight one important aspect about Lebanon's military needs: The point isn't to enable the Lebanese Army win a conventional war against a foreign army, its to empower the Army to fight long enough to prevent the establishment of a status-quo that could affect or alter the subsequent diplomatic intervention following the conflict.

    That may sound like a "deflating" statement to some, but whether we like it or not we are surrounded by bigger, more militaristic neighbors. We, on the other hand, must ultimately rely on our country's integration within the Arab and international fabric/community in order to secure our interests.

    On the other hand, we do need an Army that can confidently facedown any interior threats, such as those arising from within the Palestinian camps (whether it be Syrian-backed insurgents and terror cells, or otherwise).

    Looking back over the 3-4 years, the trend highlighted above becomes clear. In the cases of both, Syria and Israel, the Lebanese gov't has pursued coordinated international action to push for an Israeli withdrawal from Lebanese territory, and to push for the international tribunal (which is expected to try elements within the Syrian regime in connection with political assassinations in Lebanon). In Nahr el Bared, the military response has been extensive.

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