Sunday, June 24, 2007

Breaking News: UNIFIL Attacked in Roadside Bomb!

A UNIFIL armored vehicle belonging to the Spanish contingent was targeted by a roadside bomb today. So far, sources in Lebanon have reported 5 dead and 3 wounded. The explosion occurred near the village of Khiam, in southern Lebanon.

Speaking on Lebanese television, a spokesperson for UNIFIL described the incident as carrying very dangerous implications.

Although various news services have so far confirmed that the source of the explosion was not a mine, there have been conflicting reports as to whether it was a roadside bomb or a suicide bomber. Lebanese security services have recently been reporting their belief that the explosion might have been caused by a suicide bomber traveling in a car.


Images as seen on Yahoo!News

27 comments:

  1. This is phase two (or phase three if you include Gaza): Syria and Hezbollah saw the "Palestinian" terror group Fatah al Islam fail in it's mission of launching a 9-11 style attack on Beirut. Their demise at the hands of the LAF did not play to the Syrian and Iranian war clock. It did serve as a distraction in the North but lasted all too short.

    Now they are moving to open up the Southern borders by attacking peace keepers. This is moving forward at at odd pace of stops and starts. Not all the players involved are as reliable as Hezbollah. If Hezbollah means to hit a UNIFIL vehicle, it does.

    I wonder if it was an EFP? I understand Hezbollah has been using them against Israel for years.

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  2. After I made post I realized that there is no such thing as "phase 3" in this battle. I apologize for my shortsightedness. Lebanon's Sovereignty has been nearly under constant attack. The assasinations of Hariri, Gemayel, and Eido are highly visible aspects of it. Not so visible aspects would be corruption, racketeering, intimdation, and other murders for Syrian/Iranian benefit.

    On MSNBC today annoucing the death of the peace keepers...

    "In a statement on its television station Al-Manar, Hezbollah denounced the attack, calling it a "suspicious act." The militant group has had good relations with UNIFIL since the troops were first deployed in Lebanon in 1978."

    And why not. UNIFIL would post Israeli troop movements on its website. This "al Qaeda" is bullshit. It is for deniability of Syria and Hezbollah.

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  3. Anonymous11:01 PM

    typical terrorist attack that is in line with Hizballah's style and aspirations....

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  4. Anonymous11:09 PM

    عاطف مجدلاني : هذه المتفجرة زرعت الى جانب الطريق وفجرت لاسلكيا في منطقة معروف فيها القدرة الأمنية ل"حزب الله" والسؤال الذي يطرح بقوة هو هل بدأت معركة إخلاء الجنوب من القوات الدولية وحرب إلغاء القرار 1701

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  5. Anonymous1:20 AM

    Khiam is a 100% Shiite village with 99.99% support for Hezbollah, in fact there are 500 Hezbollah special units there fully armed and on constant intelligence alert, how can such things happen without their knowledge???

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  6. It most probably was not Hizballah but another Syrian backed group. As you know Hizballah is very low key in the South right now. They have moved most their operatives north of the zone. It probably was the same people who fired the Katyushas last week.

    And the guy who posted the first comment..9-11 style attack?? Where do you guys get this stuff from? Fox news?

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  7. Sorry, It was a bit "over dramatic" for some. I didn't write it. The original artical war from Agence France-Presse not Fox news. What a "9-11" attack means is a city crippling attack. Multiple strikes at key choke points or landmarks that bring everything to a standstill.


    Militants planned 9/11-style Lebanon attack
    June 03, 2007 07:51pm

    http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,21842339-38201,00.html#

    A BEIRUT newspaper has reported that Fatah al-Islam, whose fighters are under siege at a refugee camp in the north of the country, had planned a September 11-style attack on Lebanon.
    "This information was obtained by questioning arrested Fatah al-Islam members,'' An-Nahar said, without identifying its sources.

    The paper also said that explosives seized in the country's second largest city Tripoli, south of the Nahr al-Bared Palestinian refugee camp where militants were being besieged by the army for the 15th day, came from Syria.

    "Fatah al-Islam planned to attack a large hotel in the capital using four suicide truck bombs at the same time as launching suicide attacks on embassies in east and west Beirut,'' the paper said.

    An-Nahar also said the Al-Qaeda-inspired Islamist group "planned to launch attacks on the Shekka tunnel linking Beirut to Tripoli with the aim of cutting off the north and proclaiming an Islamic state there.''

    Fighting continued on Sunday around Nahr al-Bared as the deadly standoff between Lebanese troops and the militants entered its third week.

    In all 97 people have been killed since May 20, including 44 soldiers and 41 Islamist gunmen, in the bloodiest internal fighting in Lebanon since the 1975-1990 civil war.

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  8. Expand your mind FOX, and watch something other than Manar TV, read something (anything) other than Tayyar and Hezbo sites. Find out what is really going on in the world.

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  9. I'm sorry ace. Of course it was Hizballah who set the bomb. Who else could it have been? No one else in Lebanon has the motive or even possesses explosives. The Syrians are too incompetent to send anyone else down there to carry out such an operation, right? Oh and those Fatah Al Islam guys at Nahr el Bared are actually Hizballah fighters in disguise.

    The world is not black and white ace. And you do not seem to understand the grey area.

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  10. Anonymous5:54 PM

    fox,
    youre wasting your time dude. If you haven't come here to blame everything on Syria and Hizballah, then you are just a blind follower of the ayatollah who cant see what is obvious to everyone on here and just reads pro-opostition media, unlike the guys on here who are really broad-minded - Its all Hizballah, its all Syria, the US is our friend, Hariri, Siniora, Geagea and Jumblatt are Lebanese heroes- you get the idea. Oh and if you try and get into a discussion you are an idiot until you agree with their point of view. Good luck

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  11. Anonymous7:08 PM

    Man! are these guys a bunch of dim wits...Waa Waa Waa, syria this, syria that...Be careful of who you get into bed with kids, Israel and the USA have NEVER NEVER NEVER helped Lebanon or anyone else for that matter. So, so, so ignorant. And they march around war crimimals like GayGay and Jewmblat, and crooks like Hariri Inc...So pathetic...THESE people need to pack up their bags and move to France, because nobody hates Lebanon more than them...Bravo Bravo!!!

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  12. Anonymous7:29 PM

    Everyone hates Lebanon.
    And most of the rest of the Middle East.

    But very soon, that area will be back into the 19th century and nobody will care.

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  13. Anonymous9:25 PM

    USA never helped Leb. ? Look at the over Million Leb. of all kinds and any kind that found home in the USA. And many came back. Look at AUB, look at the loans and the aid, oh well may be you and the like of you should start migrating to Persia and Syria.
    And as for Fox telling us that the Hizb. left Kiham. Ya this will be a day after Ulmart will become Muslim and go on Haj.
    Seems thing are just 100% perfect in Leb. for people to be joking like that.

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  15. I'll concede it could have been an unaffiliated Palestinian who was driving the car bomb. But the odds for that to have happened without assistance (from those who benefit from this) are extremely low, not zero, but very low. I’d the perpetrator was given keys to a car, directions, maps, a schedule of UNIFIL patrols, and other relevant info.

    The individual in question could have been a 65 year old Chinese woman for all we know at this point. The group directing her would have to have known the landscape quite well. A 65 year Chinese woman however would not raise suspicions so that would be good choice of bomber. I applaud their cunning if that turns out to be the case.

    For arguments sake, what would the odds be of an outsider driving from one side of Sicily to another to perform a high profile assassination without assistance of the local mafia chieftain? The communities of Sicilian Mafia and Hezbollah are very similar in that they would spot any outsider in a second. No one could perform such a pin point operation without logistical assistance and acquiescence of the local powers that be.

    Imagine an outsider roaming the roads of an unknown city while driving a car bomb looking at maps hoping to run into a UNFIL patrol? I’d say their odds of succeeding were pretty slim.

    As for the US being Lebanon’s friend, the US has made deplorable mistakes in its dealing with Lebanon in the past. The “realist” foreign policy of James Baker III that sold out Lebanon to Syria for a false “stability” makes me want to vomit. Baker never met a dictator he didn’t like. He helped create the world we live in today. Everyone is at each other’s throats and no one trusts anyone. His kind propped up thugs and looked the other way at abuses while there was a better way readily available.

    Before Baker arrived on the scene, European colonial powers drew borders through land with no respect for indigenous peoples. This set slow motion time bombs waiting to go off in 50 to 200 years. The world is now reaping the whirlwind for their ignorance and arrogance. So if America comes into the picture late to try and right some of these blunders of the past by ourselves and others it could get ugly before it gets better, especially if non-state actors or state actors with alternative plans fight to install their vision for the region.

    The US has made one recent move to blacklist those who are actively destabilizing Lebanon from the US economy and aid. This may not seem like much to some but the US does control much of the world’s line of credit through banks and businesses so it can be a powerful weapon. If an entity or person is deemed to be destabilizing Lebanon and then blacklisted, no business or bank in the US can enter into dealings with that group or person. That creates a huge web of interconnected economic exclusion that this person or group now must overcome.

    “US to blacklist instigators of 'political discord'”

    http://www.dailystar.com.lb/article.asp?edition_id=1&categ_id=2&article_id=83316#

    Anonymous--offer a plausible alternative. Who did it? Who benefits? I can remember a Syrian pundit claiming the US was behind the assassination of Pierre Gemayel. That didn’t even pass the laugh test. And how does the US benefit from instability in the Lebanon or Mideast as this pundit and Hezbollah’s claim?

    “The Diplomacy of Silencers and Creative Chaos”

    http://www.asharqalawsat.com/english/news.asp?section=2&id=7292


    Here’s great read by one of my favorite writers on the pervasive corruption and manipulation of the masses today. I think it’s very artfully written and very relevant to the saga of Lebanon.

    “Corruption and Corruption of the Land”

    23/06/2007

    Tariq Alhomayed

    http://www.asharqalawsat.com/english/news.asp?section=2&id=9355

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  16. hello, Blacksmith:
    There are some more news from Spain. The first is that there are already 6 killed in the terrorist attack. A 19-year-old parachuter has also died. The other 2 are badly wounded, probably blind for life.
    The second thing is that there are Lebanese politicians who have told Spanish MP Gustavo de Arístegui (whose father was killed in Lebanon in the 80's) that the attack had an intentional message: they wanted to warn the troops, and that it is possible that Hizbollah has had something to do with it.
    The Government has confirmed it was a car bomb with 50 kilos of explosive. Whether there was a suicide bomber (or suicide bomberS) it is not confirmed yet.

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  17. Anonymous6:52 AM

    kawbwebz ... the thinking on this blog is that Syria wants to express its power over Lebanon by destabilizing the country, because a destabilized Lebanon benefits Syria...the same argument can be made for Israel...Israel has been working the partitioning of Lebanon for over 40 years! its plans in Iraq are working perfectly, thanks to its dual passport carrying neocon friends in the white house...Israel has always sought out the racist Christian Lebanese (im Christian btw) and their "we are pheonecians" and muslims are nothing attitude, to fragment Lebanon into bite size pieces that wouldn't be a threat to Israel (not militarily, but economically)...

    think about it people, Syria gains what in Lebanon? money? Lebanese are so corrupt that they make any Syrian theft look like child’s play…do they want power? never in a thousand years can they exert enough power over such a fragmented society, do they want water, nahhh...what on earth do they want from Lebanon? a fragmented Lebanon (and that’s the ONLY motivation behind all of this recent crap)does NOT help Syria in any way, it does however help our friends in the south.

    one last thought...please oh please don’t ever think that US aid comes without strings, as a matter of fact over 85% of money that comes from the USA has to be spent on businesses or equipment from the USA, even if its in Lebanon. Im sure it helps local communities in some ways, but its not as altruistic as you make it out to be.

    we get 10 million to build bridges, Israel gets 5 billion to blow them up.

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  18. Anonymous—

    You knowledge on these matters far exceeds mine. I very much appreciate your insights. A fractured Lebanon is weak, that is true. Who gains from that? As it has been written about Iraq; partitioning is likely to lead to multiple wars, not less war. It could be the same for Lebanon if such a thing was tried. I don’t see how Israel could implement such a plan. Or does it just stir up chaos between groups to fracture Lebanon?

    Yes, in the 1970’s Israel callously instigated violence within Lebanon through arming and training extreme elements of the Christian communities. This culminated in ethnic cleansing style atrocities, yes? The US navy and marines stepped in to save the PLO armed wing while the Palestinian civilians where left to face a blood thirsty militia as Israelis soldiers looked on. Is this what really happened?

    None of this would have occurred without President Nixon pressuring Jordan's King Hussein to let the PLO decamp to Lebanon after the PLO failed to destroy Jordan in 1970. Great idea Nixon, let’s put the PLO in southern Lebanon where they can launch guerilla attacks on Israel and then Israel can train and arm Christian Phalangist militias to kill Palestinians. That’ll work out great for Lebanon and their delicate demographic balance. It would work out great for any country, installing a heavily armed homicidal militia. Yeah.

    As for US aid policies, I agree with you.

    Whenever possible US should allow aid money to be spent locally. To do otherwise is wrong. It breeds ill will and bleeds the local economy. US goods and services may not even be higher quality or cheaper to provide so it makes no sense to do it this way. It should be done on a case by case basis. The same thing is occurring in Iraq. Letting the local talent bid and vie for contracts would have kept a lot of people busy rebuilding their country. It would have giving people a stake in their future. Sure millions may have disappeared in bad deals and thefts but at least people would have been working, not making IEDs. As it is there’s hundreds of millions overcharged and missing with a US company named Haliburton.

    As for Syria’s claim on Lebanon, any country or piece of land is of value even if you can’t control the fractured nature of the disparate peoples. According to this source Syria was raking in hundreds of millions of dollars a year from various businesses:

    “Lebanese critics also argue that Syria has also profited financially from its privileged position in the smaller nation, reportedly making hundreds of millions of dollars annually through its influence over Lebanon's ports, telecommunications industry, casino and other economic sectors.”
    --Kate Seelye

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  19. Anonymous9:55 AM

    kawbwebz,

    ananymous' reasoning is gravely flawed along several lines. I'd suggest you take it with a lot of skpetcisicm. Obviously, anonymous is an opposition supporter. A weak but unfragmented Lebanon was always the choice of the Syrians. In fact, the Syrian governing regime is a sectarian minority governing a majority. Therefore, the Syrian regime would like to keep some Lebanese factions (specifically Sunnis) in line so that their dictatorial regime won't get threatened!!! See it from this perspective and many things will make sense !!!!!!

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  20. Jimmy2:46 PM

    I agree. According to anonymous, we're supposed to believe that this is all some sort of US-Israeli plot to partition the ME. Maybe thats whats going on in Iraq, but in Lebanon its different and Syria's guilt is so obvious only someone blinded by their own ideology (such as you know who) wouldn't see it.

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  21. anon you said "one last thought...please oh please don’t ever think that US aid comes without strings"

    the thing is anon, we all know that already, and will freely admit it, now will you be brave enough to look at the other side of the coin?

    "please don't ever think that Iranian aid comes without strings"

    The Iranians aren't helping hizballah la sweid 3yoonhon either.

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  22. Anonymous4:47 PM

    Believe it or not kids, im not with the "opposition"...I'm with Lebanon...Nobody in the history of Lebanon has ripped off Lebanon more than the Lebanese. Nobody in the history of Lebanon has killed more Lebanese civilians than Turkey, followed by Israel. By immediately labeling me "opposition", you fall into the trap that has been set for all of us Lebanese...Doesn't HZ and FPM and Marada and M14 and Hariri Inc, and Jmblat, etc...don't we all carry Lebanese ID cards? Yet, the SECOND you are given a chance, you want to divide these groups and those groups, and make it us against them or them against us. This is how countries are broken, by people who are so filled with hate and anger, that they cannot even look at their fellow countryman as an equal, but as "another" entity, as "something" else..Do we not all like Fairuz, and kibbe neyi, and ziad, dabke, and the mountains, and the sea? Do we not all look at the flag and smile and dream of a paradise that can be? Of course we do, but we must put Lebanon first, not our local militia, or political group, or state sponsor, or whatever (syria, israel, usa, iran, france, whomever...)

    I asked this question the other day, "why is it that some countries are easy to destabilize and others are not?" ... the answer that was given to me was very smart..."you need two things in a country in order to take it apart, fear, stupidity, and greed"... BINGO! thats what we have in that little strip of land on the sea...If any of you have been to Lebanon, you will see that a person will fix his property up to his property line, then stop...or even better, paint just what he sees from his balcony (the rest of the building is raw unpainted concrete) this is SOOOOO Lebanese, and it shows the mentality of our people...its a shame really.

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  23. Jimmy4:47 PM

    Well said La Libanessa...

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  24. Anonymous4:49 PM

    three things

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  25. Vorzheva, thanks for the update from Spain my friend, and sorry for your country's loss.

    Thanks to everyone for your comment and sorry I haven't been able to join the debate here but I am spending a lot of time away from my computer these days.

    Whatever one's political positions or personal "spite" resides there needs to be a base upon which all Lebanese need to come together:

    A recognition and adherence to the state and unity in confronting aggressions - both when they come from Israel and Syria.

    It seems fair enough to me to ask that anyone willing to work towards a better Lebanon first recognize the existence of Lebanon and the dangers that this Lebanon faces.

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  26. Anonymous1:46 AM

    A recognition and adherence to the state?

    Sure as long as that state is not working for its own personal benefit and contrary to the benefit of the people.

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  27. Jimmy4:56 AM

    Human nature is human nature anonymous, either you work to solve the problems through the system in place, even working to change that system from the inside, or send everything up in flames trying to work outside it.

    Extremists and radicals try to work outside it, not caring for what they destroy or burn. Moderates and reformists work within it.

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