Friday, April 13, 2007

Never Again



Its time to stand up to the armed thugs before its too late, before it happens again!

18 comments:

  1. Are they displaying it for photo taking? I'm watching TV and I see this program on FTV with the bus in the background and discussing the same subject.

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  2. Well its the 32 year anniversary today, so I'm not surprised they're discussing it.

    I remember a few months ago some blogs were talking about how the bus (the 1975 one) was up for sale, and how it was sitting in some lot rusting away. I haven't followed the story though, there was a call that it be put in a museum.

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  3. BJ,

    Right sentiment, wrong audience... We have all learned the futility of war, but Nasrallah and his followers persist. Their goal is not this world, after all.

    The problem is; how do you deal with someone who's main goal is your eradication? How do you convince them that they need to address the secular needs in this life, while their minds are focused on the next? Even if we did not want to go to war, their intransigence will surely lead us to it.

    People who follow are surely smart, like the rest of us if not more, but their entire mental framework is focused on the "next life"... It is as if they are stuck is some self-perpetuating, self-confirming mental loop fed by a charismatic, intelligent leader. And the more intelligent they tend to be, the more self-entrenched their beliefs are... Kinda like a twisted, self-reinforcing form of confirmation bias; you see this in many of those smart people who still follow Aoun.

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  4. Thanks Jeha for commenting so lucidly on the subject of clouded judgement.

    I agree with you on the point of religious zeal but I think I disagree (if I caught the implication correctly) that it plays a large role among the number of "opposition" supporters.

    As far as I can tell, and this applies to a number of close friends of mine who support the opposition (or lets say, don't currently support the government), the decision has more to do with personal feelings and past personal experiences with elements within the government, than with religion (even among the sectarian ones).

    In short, even though these people can correctly identify and cognitively address national issues, they choose to reject the logical end [that it is imperative to support the government at this moment in time], simply because of personal reasons, and at the expense of what is (what even they deep down recognize as being) beneficial for the country.

    In even shorter...they are being selfish. I think that is the case among at least 85% of Aoun supporters - they either hate Hariri or the LF, and that, for them, is worth sacrificing the country over.

    Good luck! [sarcasm :P]

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  5. I agree, they are being selfish and short-sighted, but the core supporters are motivated by otherworldly aspirations.

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  6. A very important insight of yours, bj, and a very distressing one. By now most Lebanese have figured out the most important lesson of the Israeli response in the face of Lebanese acquiescence to Hezbollah's war of last summer:

    Nothing good.

    But the Hezb followers have not. Which means that if Hezbollah does indeed start up war again, a morally appropriate Israeli response would be to bomb the civilian targets of Hezbollah supporters directly - far more destruction than Israel inflicted in the 2006 war.

    The alternative? For Lebanese to stop fantasizing about how the behavior of non-Lebanese actors on the world stage should change and concentrate on changing themselves and their countrymen instead.

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  7. Anonymous12:29 PM

    I think you are misinformed on this fact Jeha. Are you saying that the core LF supporters are less religious than the HA ones? They would take a pure Christian state over the present day state of Lebanon any day.

    So really you can't categorize in that way.

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  8. Anon 05:29

    It is not misinformation when you stick to the facts. FL are a party, with a lot of backing from sectarian fanatics. Such attitude is anathema to Christians. Hezb is more than that; it is an armed cult, with a prophet-like leader who obeys a "Faqih", God's representative on earth. To many a Moslem, this is blasphemous.

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  9. Answering an Idiot4:20 PM

    Anonymous: When was the last time you heard of a Christian suicide bomber? When was the first time you heard of one?

    I thought so.

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  10. Ah Solomon2,

    First of all, I think I should make one thing clear. If the Lebanese gave were acquiescent to Hizballah in the war, that acquiescence was given grudgingly and was a direct result of the IDF's complete mismanagement of the war.

    Now let me break down that statement a bit more:
    1) That if is a big one!
    2) By mismanagement, here I am refering to the complete disregard for the condemnation Hizballah received from the Lebanese government and the Arab world for the its abduction of the 2 IDF soldiers. Instead of building on that, the IDF chose to launch a massive war on the entire country, (on the basis of calculations my 5 year old cousin wouldn't be convinced by) a war it didn't even carry out properly (Hizballah is still around ain't it?) and which lead to massive civilian casualties in Lebanon and military casualties in Israel (well in Lebanon but they were Israeli).

    So yeah, the Lebanese didn't support the IDF dropping millions of cluster bombs 2 days before the end of the war, they didn't support blowing up bridges in Jbeil, they didn't support Israel's refusal to hit Syria, which everyone in Israel and the rest of the world acknowledges as being the real source of your problems (along with Iran).

    But the mistake is Israel's not Lebanon's. The Lebanese government took a brave step in condemning Hizballah's attack. The Israel's threw that away and cost themselves close to 200 dead.

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  11. "Answering an Idiot", there were quite a few Christian suicide bombers; look up the history of Lebanon, and you will find them. Hint: many were women.

    Suicide bombers are a more complex phenomena, and cannot be taken as a criteria of religious fundamentalism; the Japanese had the Kamikaze, the Vietnamese had a few suicide squads during the Tet offensive, the Tamil have their own "secular" suicide bombers...

    You though wrong on the facts. The point remains, however, that Hezb's ideology encourage something far worse than suicide; it is the exclusive belief that their own rights trump everyone else's, and that their leaders are "divinely" inspired.

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  12. Like I said, Nothing good.

    Israeli "mismanagement" has nothing to do with Lebanese choices. Had the Lebanese government taken advantage of the positive public and international opinion you noted in the first few days by accepting that the government would split and appealed to the world for help in stopping Hezbollah's attacks, the outcome almost certainly would have been different and more positive for Lebanon. I'm afraid that the one lesson that Lebanon hasn't learned is that a sovereign country is responsible for activities at its borders and if its citizens belligerently attack a neighbor, the country as a whole is held responsible - especially if its rulers undertake to protect the perpetrators. (If a man kills one neighbor, kidnaps another, and hides in his mom's house, do you expect the parents to turn him in or shoot when the police knock at the door?)

    Such wilful blindness may yet again cost Lebanon dearly. As for Israel, they don't have their soldiers back, but the northern part of the country is no longer uninhabitable from Hezbollah rocket attacks, so in that sense the Israeli "won" because they got their country back. ALL parties agreed that Hezbollah was a Lebanese problem for the Lebanese to handle with U.N. assistance - if the Lebanese politicians could only work up the courage and initiative to do so, that is.

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  13. Solomon2 I don't think you understood what I was saying, either that or you don't understand the mechanics of Middle East politics.

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  14. blod statements..

    ;)

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  15. JB,

    I disagree with a lot of points (specially only one side wants to eradicate the other, but in light of a bully I will not tackle them)but with you I can have a constructive debate, with a Zionist, that is a different case since they see everything done as "Rightful" and then threaten us afterwards with a stick...

    First, Israel could have resolved to diplomacy since they argue they want peace.

    Second, Israel is responsible for most of the Shiites supporting Hezbollah due to their brutality in handling issues, not to forget how the Southern Lebanese Army (Israeli manufactured) treated the citizens there

    Third, Israel's "self-defence" is nothing when according to the ex-General Secretary the casualties of women and children were more than the casualties of the combatants, and I assure you that 99% were from the Lebanese side, since the Israelis got bombshelters, while the IAF was having fun eradicating one village at a time.

    Fourth, I love how one nation argues it is peace loving when it disregards the overall interational institutions and slaughters 1300 weapons, and worse using UN banned weaponry (confirmed by the International Red Cross, and one day the Cluster Bombs would be banned, not that it matters to Israel since they always fail to respect Human Rights in Palestine)

    Fifth, the whole domino effect started when the Zionists displaced the Palestinians outside their homes in a nation called Palestine, and simply expected the "Arab World" to intigrate them as simple as that and everyone would live in Harmony.

    Sixth, We have not forgotten your 1982 invasion and bombing half the capital in its utmost brutal sense (tagged by the Presidential Diplomatic Team of Morris Draper and Phil Habib), without holding any accountability.

    Seventh, I can go forever, just stop acting like the victims while you are the bullies. And if you read my blog perfectly, you would realize I am not a Pro-Hezbollah...
    bleh Zionist recruit trying to do his business in promoting normalization...

    Marxist From Lebanon

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  16. Hey MFL, Shta2nelak ya zalameh!

    I can't really reply properly as I've just spent about 2 hours writing out a massive reply in another of my posts' comment section. Check that one out if you have time to read! I think you'll find it interesting (although I reckon you'll disagree with me :P).

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