Wednesday, November 01, 2006

The principles of the Alawite Regime in Syria

In order to be able to explain the survival of this criminal regime throughout numerous epochs of war and change, I had to think and observe their policies over a long period of time. Finally, I was able to 'reconstruct' the will that Hafez Assad might have left for his heir Bashar.

The principles of the Alawite Regime in Syria:

  1. No Principle (when the situation requires)
  2. Create the fire then sell the water
  3. Defeat is victory
  4. Always negotiate on the verge of the abyss
  5. There are no 'burned' cards
  6. The regime never fights, others fight for it
  7. Survival is revival

PS: If Niccolo Machiavelli was alive and had the chance to study this regime he would have resigned his duties a long time ago and went into exile.

32 comments:

  1. Go Broncos7:00 PM

    Is this a serious analysis or are you poking fun? I am an American very interested learning about the Middle East.

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  2. Anonymous10:59 PM

    This is silly gibberish!

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  3. Mr broncos, indeed this is a serious take on the principles of this regime. If you study its history carefully, like I did, you will come up with the same conclusions as to how they function.

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  4. Raider of the Found Ark4:04 AM

    Why don't u share some of this "history" you've studied so carefully instead of some bull about no strategy being a strategy and defeat being victory...its garbage...

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  5. Mr Lost (ark) it seems you lost your compass. I think the points are self explanatory...

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  6. In order to understand how Syria functioned and functions, having those principles in mind goes a long way in helping the observer of this regime out of his confusion.
    The Syrian regime used its defeats on numerous occasions and turned them into victories. The most notable example are the twin defeats on 1967 and 1973. These defeats helped the regime consolidate its power base using brute force against its people, under the pretext that "no voice is higher than that of the battle". A recent defeat, its withdrawal from Lebanon was turned into a victory for the regime that used this event to tighten its grip and clamp freedoms and political rights under the pretext of a confrontation with the western powers.

    PS: I didn't mention that "no strategy is a strategy". Since you didn't get it, I have to explain it to you, it means that when necessary, principles 2 to 7 can be put aside, meaning that the ruler, while respecting his core principles, is pragmatical enough to know when to improvise.

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  7. Anonymous9:00 AM

    So then the question becomes, is there a way to bring a better life to Syrians without toppling its regime?

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  8. anonymous, unfortunately I came to a firm conclusion that this regime is beyond repair.
    As long as it is standing not only the Syrians will continue to suffer but also the Lebanese and the Palestinians.

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  9. manuk5:32 PM

    While the Syrians were in Lebanon the Lebanese enjoyed peace and stability!

    They are one country and the colonialists broke them apart, all your thinking is wrong if you don't know this!

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  10. Janzir1:37 AM

    To manuk, Lebanon will never go back to under the Syrian shoe. Now we are finally free and independent and great leaders with much vision will lead us out of this black pit.

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  11. debate said...

    anonymous, unfortunately I came to a firm conclusion that this regime is beyond repair.
    As long as it is standing not only the Syrians will continue to suffer but also the Lebanese and the Palestinians.

    -------------

    Need some help with toppling the syrian regime? We, Israelis, are always ready. Just take care of their babies, keep them away from us.

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  12. Anonymous9:32 PM

    The ministers resigned...is this the beginning of the coup?

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  13. Anonymous,
    No one really knows when the beginning of the coup is, and whether the coup is going to happen. One thing seems obvious though, the international court is bothering quite a lot of people both whithin Lebanon and in Syria. It would make more sense to link the resignation to the swift progress of the international court and the determination of Hizabllah and Amal to protect their allies. Would this point to any particular allies mentionned in the post of Debate ? That's up to your judgement, sense of causality or your denial.
    -------------------------------
    Manuk,
    Please look up the Hama massacre and then inform us about peace and stability.

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  14. The Economist weekly said that Assad is selling water for the fire he started.

    "Mr Assad would like the UN to stop investigating Syria's role in the Hariri assassination, a guarantee that America will not try to undermine his regime, a return of Syria's influence in Lebanon and the return of the Golan Heights, which Israel captured in 1967."

    http://www.economist.com/world/africa/PrinterFriendly.cfm?story_id=8113364

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  15. Manuk8:38 AM

    The people of Hama attacked the Syrian police and killed dozens of them, they tried to overthrow Syria's government, like Lebanon is trying to do. Both will share the same fate

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  16. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  17. Manuk I assume you are a Syrian supporter of the criminal Alawite regime. Maybe you are the son (or lap dog) of a corrupted general in the army. The regime you are defending killed 40,000 innocent civilian in the massacre of Hama in 1982.

    Just to make you relax, I assure you that we will not share any fate this time. The only ones who are going to hell are you guys if they you ever try to step into Lebanon again.

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  18. Nobody,
    Your government wants the Alawite regime to remain in power forever. During the last war, the US was studying serious plans to topple the regime. However, your government put all its weight + the Israeli lobby in the US to stop such plans. Apparently, your government thinks that Assad is the best thing to have in Syria since the Golan is calm like a graveyard since 1974.

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  19. debate said...

    Nobody,
    Your government wants the Alawite regime to remain in power forever. During the last war, the US was studying serious plans to topple the regime. However, your government put all its weight + the Israeli lobby in the US to stop such plans. Apparently, your government thinks that Assad is the best thing to have in Syria since the Golan is calm like a graveyard since 1974.

    --------------

    Frankly I think that you exagerate. As far as I know Israeli lobby has nothing to do with this. But the Americans apparently reached conclusion after Iraq that toppling Asad will bring nothing good. There is some surprising and unexplanable pessimism in Washington about the ability of Arabs to take such an opportunity as getting rid of Asad and using it for something better than installing Muslim Brothers in power.

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  20. Nobody, there's is some truth too in what you say. But, you have to concede that people like Assad remain in power because they manage to convince other governments that if they are gone "muslim borthers" will be in power, or a civil war will erupt, or people will open a Golan front for example. These things are overblown and exaggerated. Plus, Iraq and Syria are two different cases. Iraq always had internal problem even in days of early Islamic Caliphates. One just needs to browse their long history to find out.

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  21. Manuk9:35 PM

    The army and the fighters in the resistance are the most uncorrupt of all the Lebanese. They don't care about money like the Saudi lap dogs called Hariri and the Future Movement!

    You think that if someone doesn't support Israel and America like you do then they are not Lebanese, but I will tell you that we are more Lebanese than all the March 14th who run to the people who bomb us for help!

    Syria is a sisterly arab nation and Iran is a brotherly muslim one and there is nothing wrong with supporting them. We are not interested in filling our pockets but in keeping our pride! Maybe Jumblatt and his lap dogs could learn about pride!

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  22. Mr "Iranian mel halel", I refer you to point number 6 in my post.

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  23. I just want to tell you debate

    Many Israelis, me including , we don't see you as a regular Arab country. We indeed see you as something special and there is a perception here in Israel that that part of the country that lies to north to HezbollahLand, say at least Beirut, is actually more similar to Israel than to its neighbors like Syria. And I wish you luck in your struggle with these fanatics.

    As to Syria my experience of living under a totalitarian regime suggests that after all those years under Asads Syria is a hollow society. The moment the regime falls, the country will descend into chaos.

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  24. manuk4:45 PM

    Just like I thought, no answer from mr. debate...typical!

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  25. Anonymous1:31 PM

    To debate :
    Your post is as stupid as dangerous.
    Why don't you mind your country's problems and stop covering your inability to rule it by criticizing the Syrians?
    You seem to have enough time and ressources for studies, Well study this :
    - the inability of the lebenese to rule their country and live together without the presence of foreign forces.
    - bombing political opponents, a Lebanese old tradition, form the 50's to today.
    - the early days of Syrian Army presence in Lebanon, how it helped the lebanese stop their...well let's call it : decades "living together" problems
    - the Taef Accord : how the UN, and the international community asked the Syrians to clean up the Lebanese mess
    - as you seem to have sufficiant ressources related to the "Alawite" regime, may I suggest you spend some time on episodes such as the Lebanese coming to Damascus and asking the "Regime", as your Sheikh (??) Saad calls it, to settle their personal or business problems with Lebanon other sects representatives.
    - May I also suggest you widen your point of view and understand that life is not based on sectarism as you Lebanese do.
    If Syria has problems, first, it's none of your business, second, it's not because of a sectarian regime.
    Leave the Syrians with their problems and stop playnig the smart guy, try to be a real one instead by convincing the international community that Lebanon doesn't need any foreign forces to rule and manage it's sects and communities.
    By the way, I will be glad if the Syrians stopped their pathetic speech of brother countries and treat you as you deserve.

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  26. Anonymous1:33 PM

    Lak shou, you don't accept critics ? why did my post disappear?

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  27. anonymous:
    It didn't disappear, it just took time for approval (I was asleep!). I take it you're new at this?

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  28. Look who's talking now, a supporter of the Alawite regime in Syria, the regime that was created in order to interfere in the internal affairs of other Arab nations (Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan, Iraq) the regime that served its Israeli and Iranian masters like no one else. Now someone like has no right to be revolted if the Lebanese populace has a say about your rotten regime.

    PS: While in Lebanon, we have indeed sectarian problems at least our system was built in way that each is represented. However, in Syria, there is only and only one small minority sect that runs the show, while the others live in exclusion and are victims of 17 security agencies. Figure this out!

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  29. manuk3:11 AM

    I don't what the hell you're talking about debate...serve Israeli masters? interfere in Jordan? Whatever!!!

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  30. yes manuk you don't know, usually tools don't know they just follow orders.

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  31. Anonymous12:16 AM

    Haha, you said tools.

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